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Official GIGABYTE Forum  |  Questions about GIGABYTE products  |  Motherboards with Intel processors  |  P55 Motherboard Processor fixtures « previous next »
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Author Topic: P55 Motherboard Processor fixtures  (Read 12169 times)
MindLESS
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« on: October 15, 2009, 12:48:51 pm »

Does anyone know offhand, or without having to take their machine to bits, who makes the CPU socket on the Gigabyte boards?

I belive the main people are Foxconn, Tyco AMP and LOTES.

I read an article about the Foxconn not working well with extreme overclocking due to poor contact with the base of the CPU and the current draw being split over fewer pins and burning up the CPU. I don't have plans on overclocking much, it's just curiosity.

I've got a P55-UD4, in case different sockets manufacturers are used on different tiers of boards.
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R_N_B
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« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2009, 12:56:56 pm »

Foxconn according to the socket on my P55 UD3R board.  I am fairly certain that all Gigabyte P55 motherboards have their sockets made by Foxconn.
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Beekeeper
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2009, 02:51:18 pm »

Hi MindLESS

total surprise Shocked for me as Foxconn is recognized as being very good in connectors quality, that's why used by Gigabyte.
could you provide the link to this article?
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“Rivers know this: there is no hurry. We shall get there some day.”
MindLESS
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« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2009, 02:31:59 pm »

Original article:
http://www.anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.aspx?i=3661

It does state that it is to do with extreme overlocking (seems to be >4.4GHz clock speeds)
Fairly sure the Foxconn would be within Intel's tolerances - this is a bit beyond specs and requires some fairly heavy duty active cooling to acheive (air+water won't be cutting it!)
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oggmonster
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« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2009, 09:37:40 am »

If you look here http://forum.giga-byte.co.uk/index.php/topic,638.0.html Bex has got her x58 i7 920 at 4.5ghz prime stable. My GA-EP45-UD3P with an E8600 can reach 4.53ghz prime95 stable. Both boards use the foxconn cpu sockets (as far as i'm aware).
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MindLESS
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« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2009, 12:30:31 pm »

I don't think it's a problem with Foxconn in general. As the topic titlesaid it's regarding the P55 (therefore LGA1156 socket) specifically.

Also, Bex's is an X58 i7-920 therefore it's got an LGA1366 connector. According to the Anandtech article, a good number of the pins are used for providing power to the CPU.
The other machine you mentioned is a P45 motherboard, so an LGA775 socket. Pins may be making better contact on that due to a lower density (speculation on my part - but from memory the rough package sizes have stayed constant between Core2 and i5/i7)

The problem experienced (across a number of board manufacturers) was that the LGA1156 has fewer power pad and a number of these weren't making good/any contact and so the current draw was being split across the remaining ones. This lead to too much power being put through a too few pins/pads and the pins/socket melting.

The problem isn't as bad with the 1366 as it has more power points, so lower load across each point. Lower load means less heat.

Personally I'm completely happy with my board - but I'll bear it in mind when overclocking. I'll probably take out the CPU and check the contact it's had with the socket before doing anything heavy with it.

BTW - What's the bike next to you? Keep trying to figure but it's a bit pixelated to work out.
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oggmonster
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« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2009, 01:11:58 pm »

Ohh interesting article! Did not know that!

Oh and its a 09 Kawasaki Ninja 250R  Wink
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MindLESS
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« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2009, 01:49:36 pm »

Yeah, I was rather interested when reading it.
Makes sense thinking about it - having 125+ watts on one of those little CPU pads seems excessive in hindsight. Splitting it up over the pins makes much more sense. Would never occur to me without having to think about it really.

Nice, I've got an 02 Triumph Daytons 955i CE =D
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ex58
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« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2009, 10:58:57 am »

Your socket will look like this:



Another source:
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=234723
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runn3R
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« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2009, 07:52:33 am »

Here is information from Foxconn:

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Ratty
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« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2009, 01:48:31 am »

My GA-P55-UD4P just arrived and it says:
Foxconn 115XDBP 9701
on the back of the Motherboard on the CPU Socket Mounting Plate.
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Pottypete
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« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2009, 08:10:50 pm »

And some of them CPU's can draw 140 watts Too,
O/C does carry some risks to your kit
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MindLESS
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« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2009, 09:54:00 am »

Yup - increase the voltage and you'll be upping your current draw a lot.
Overclocking can always be risky as you're operating items outside of their intended threshold.

Thanks for your response, runn3R - I'll be careful if I decide to overclock my chip now =)
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Beekeeper
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« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2009, 11:18:28 am »

seems like LOTES sockets will arrive with new mobos, see these links:
http://forum.giga-byte.co.uk/index.php/topic,734.msg3306.html#new
http://www.clunk.org.uk/forums/news-hardware-tech-news-around-globe/26369-gigabyte-p55a-mobos-sata3-usb3-3x-usb-power.html#post74623
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MindLESS
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« Reply #14 on: October 26, 2009, 12:33:02 pm »

It's a shame I already have a stock P55 =/
Oh well - it's good to see that Gigabyte have responded to the reports (even though the original sockets are fit for purpose still)
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